Great this Month

  Armeria Pink Petite

A delightful clump forming evergreen plant ideal for edging, container culture or simply adding colour to the front of garden beds and rockeries. Short but prolific stems of soft mauve/pink coloured flowers cluster together to form impressive round globes during spring which last well if cut for fresh posies. The attractive foliage comprises of fine grass-like leaves providing an interesting textural presence year round.

Armerias are a hardy perennial found in a range of soil types and climatic conditions around the world ranging from storm-swept coastal zones through to alpine meadows.

  Armeria Pretty Petite

• Forms a tight, tufted mound of ornamental, grass-like foliage for year round interest.
• Long flowering perennial topped with masses of globe shaped, soft pink flowers through much of the year with main flush in spring.
• Low maintenance and easy to grow.
• Dry tolerant once established.

  Hellebore Molly's White

With delightful cup-shaped white blooms adorning this beautiful Hellebore throughout winter and early spring, 'Molly’s White' is destined to become an essential addition to any semi-shaded border or container. Beautiful green flushing and a dusky pink reverse to each petal make 'Molly’s White' a simple yet opulent statement plant that would be an unbeatable indoor specimen for up to three weeks during it’s extended flowering time. Upon planting outdoors it is a valuable, easy-care evergreen that will continue to delight well after the last blooms fade.

 • Beautiful white flowers with blush pink tones from winter to spring

• Long flowering period

• Vigorous evergreen perennial with a tidy growth habit

  Hellebore Tutu
  • Flowers feature elegant, ruffled centres with pale pink, flecked petals.
  • Flowers from mid winter through to spring
  • Vigorous grower with tidy plant habit
  • Hardy evergreen foliage
  • Ideal for low light areas and winter colour
  • Easy to grow with minimal maintenance
  Hemerocallis Stella Bella

Commonly known as 'Day Lily', members of this family are known world wide for their hardiness, beauty and reliability and H. 'Stella Bella' is no exception.

The golden yellow flowers are produced in great quantities on 50cm long stems. In addition to its beauty this particular variety stands apart from the rest in its remarkable ability to bloom and re-bloom for up to six months of the year.


Foliage is strap-like reaching approximately 40cm in height and, unlike many other varieties in the family, is evergreen. A truly rewarding plant for the novice and experienced gardener alike.

  Iberis Winter Glow

This small, evergreen perennial more commonly known as 'candytuft' has always been highly regarded as a decorative garden plant. The attractive foliage forms a neat dome which is
cloaked in lacy white flower heads throughout winter and spring.
Spot flowering can also appear during the rest of the year. A premium selection for edging gardens, rockeries or as a container specimen.

  Lavandula Violet Lace

Early flowering forms of lavender with compact habits and aromatic grey foliage. Emerging from early winter, purple coloured lavender flower heads provide a lively display for what can be a dreary time in garden landscapes. L. 'Violet Lace' offers flowers of an intense deep purple colour whereas L. 'Lavender Lace' is at the other end of the spectrum in soft shades of lilac. Middle ground is where you will find the colourings of V. 'Winter Lace' whose fragrant flower heads are crowned with ruffled, mid lilac coloured bracts that soften with age giving a delightful dappled effect.

Lavandula (the name of this genus) is derived from the latin word lavare which means 'to wash' in recognition of its common use since Roman times in soaps and various toiletries. In Elizabethan times laundresses were referred to as 'lavendres' due to their use of lavender-scented water to impart the herbs fresh scent through their washing. Over the centuries a host of ailments were sought to be cured through various applications and preparations involving the use of lavender. Today this amazing plant continues to delight gardeners with its soothing scent, drought tolerance, ease of care and range of uses whether in the garden or dried for floral crafts.

Lavender stoechas makes reference to where it originated, the Islands of Stoechades, off the coast of France in the Mediterrranean, renamed since as the Iles de Hyeres.

  Lavandula Winter Lace

Early flowering forms of lavender with compact habits and aromatic grey foliage. Emerging from early winter, purple coloured lavender flower heads provide a lively display for what can be a dreary time in garden landscapes. L. 'Violet Lace' offers flowers of an intense deep purple colour whereas L. 'Lavender Lace' is at the other end of the spectrum in soft shades of lilac. Middle ground is where you will find the colourings of V. 'Winter Lace' whose fragrant flower heads are crowned with ruffled, mid lilac coloured bracts that soften with age giving a delightful dappled effect.

Lavandula (the name of this genus) is derived from the latin word lavare which means 'to wash' in recognition of its common use since Roman times in soaps and various toiletries. In Elizabethan times laundresses were referred to as 'lavendres' due to their use of lavender-scented water to impart the herbs fresh scent through their washing. Over the centuries a host of ailments were sought to be cured through various applications and preparations involving the use of lavender. Today this amazing plant continues to delight gardeners with its soothing scent, drought tolerance, ease of care and range of uses whether in the garden or dried for floral crafts.

Lavender stoechas makes reference to where it originated, the Islands of Stoechades, off the coast of France in the Mediterrranean, renamed since as the Iles de Hyeres.

  Loropetalum Plum Gorgeous

• Deepest, darkest coloured foliage found amongst Loropetalums - retaining colour year round
• Vivid deep raspberry coloured, tasseled flowers during spring and autumn
• Maintains a naturally dense, domed habit
• Easy to grow with minimal maintenance

  Rhodanthe Paper Cascade

red in Australia this charming cultivar belongs to the select group of wild flowers we commonly call ‘everlastings’. The delicate foliage is a grey-green with a mild chamomile perfume and forms a neat mound with a somewhat weeping appearance. A profusion of flowers is produced in spring beginning with pointed crimson buds which open into pretty, star shaped, white paper daisies. When in full flower it is one of the most spectacular native plants available for borders and other high profile positions in the garden.

The unique trailing habit of R. ‘Paper Cascade’ also makes it an excellent specimen in pots and hanging baskets.

  Rhodanthe Paper Star

One of the most popular native plants in recent years has been this compact, free flowering perennial. The small white daisy blooms commonly referred to as everlasting daisies as their papery petals (actually bracts) make them ideal for drying to be used in floral arrangements and other home crafts. If grown in a container 'Paper Star' can also be brought indoors for short spells as a lovely alternative to cut flower arrangements.


To dry flowers, cut the stems just as the flower begins to open and hang in loose bunches, upside down, in a dry place out of direct sunlight. In 3-4 weeks the flower will be properly dried and will retain their shape and colour indefinitely.
By the way - some of our readers may think they know this plant by the botanical name of Helipterum anthmoides. Well, you would be right! Taxonomists decided to split the rather large genus of Helipterum into several new groups and H. anthemoides, along with many others, have been re-named as Rhodanthe. Although confusing at times this revision will help to ensure that plants are more accurately named and described in the future.